Diary of a Young Naturalist

Diary of a Young Naturalist

Diary of a Young Naturalist

ISBN: 1908213795

This book is one of the most beautiful pieces of poetic prose I’ve read in a long time, and I’m studying literature. Beginning with Saturday 21 March – spring – Dara takes us through an entire year of his life as an Autistic naturalist.

I bought the book to add to my collection of works by Autistic authors, and while I’d read a lot of praise prior to reading it, I didn’t realise just how excellent it is until I’d started reading it myself. By the time I reached May I bought a copy for a friend of mine who has an Autistic son who is also fascinated by (and very well-versed on) nature, not only because it’s an excellent book but also because her son reminds me of a younger version of Dara and I thought he’d enjoy it too.

Though I wasn’t diagnosed until I was in my 30s, I can relate to Dara’s experiences of school (in his first school anyway) and I too sought solace in wild places, though this changed when I moved from my grandparents’ house in the countryside to the city I live in now. There was a large period of time where I lacked a connection with the natural world, yet even when my visits were sporadic and fleeting, I’ve always found a sense of calm when surrounded by green and cocooned by a canopy of trees.

Since reading, I’ve encouraged my children to spend time searching for nature wherever we can find it. Our tiny concrete courtyard garden is filling with pots of tangled plants and trailing vines because I forgot to buy trellis (I’m not a natural gardener), but it’s also full of woodlice, butterflies, ants, bees, and finches. Through taking the time to explain the wonders of the natural world, my older boy (also Autistic) is no longer frightened of bees, accepts that wasps do have an important role in the circle of life, and will go for walks in the woods without much complaining. My younger son (also Neurodivergent) has always been a nature lover, but we’ve spent more time together watching nature documentaries, going on bug hunts, and searching for “baby ducks” whenever we’re near water. One of his proudest moments during lockdown is helping me rescue a ladybird from drowning in a water feature, and then checking on it regularly to make sure it was still okay.

This book has made me appreciate the world around me more freely and openly. In a world where we’re constantly rushing, it became too easy for me to forget to really see what it has to offer. I’ve seen more butterflies, birds, and bees since reading Dara’s diary, and I don’t think it’s purely because there are physically more of them. I’m looking for them. Watching them. Truly appreciating and connecting with creatures which used to flit past my peripheral vision.

The beauty of Dara’s words match the beauty of nature, and I’m genuinely sad that the book had to end.

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